Tag Archives: Bunions

How to Stay Mobile and Independent

There is no denying: the older we get, the less mobile we become. Our hearts, nervous systems, muscles and bones gradually change and inhibit our ability to walk. Not only may this impact our work performance, it will eventually restrict us in making the best of our retirement years. No matter your hobby, it either directly involves walking, or it requires you to get from point A to point B.

Let’s compare the human body to an engine. Taking care of the cylinders, optimizing your performance while idling and make sure your car gets clean air and gas for efficient combustion. The better you take care of the engine, the more resilient it becomes. Humans can engage in a variety of exercises to “build a better engine/walking machine” through impairment-based exercises and to “build a better engine/walking machine” through task-oriented motor learning exercises. The table provides in this article, displays exercises you can perform at home with where they help your body and your engine. Click here to read more about the topic and please talk to your physician to determine which case of action fits best to your individual situation.

Some engines may benefit from tuning-up system components like new air filters or better belts. Pro-active foot treatments, like Laser Therapy, can tune-up your ability to walk and improve mobility in the long run by treating arthritis and many other conditions. Some of the benefits include:

  • Quick treatments around 4-8 minutes per session
  • No known negative side effects
  • Non-invasive; works at a cellular level
  • Painless; instant relief

“In using MLS Laser Therpy the cells of the tendons, ligaments, muscles and even the skin repairs itself faster,” Dr. Smith notes, “as the inflammation is reduced, the pain subsides, helping the body achieve a speedy recovery.” Learn more about Laser Therapy here, and please don’t hesitate to contact Dr. Smith if you have any questions about you or your loved one’s mobility challenges.

How Sports Injuries Can Affect You Later in Life

For many of us, one of life’s great joys was playing sports in our youth. A lot of you know I’m an avid cyclist and have been for some time now, but there is always the daunting possibility of an injury that can have ramifications decades later. You probably even know someone who played softball or football in high school or college who still has a bad back or knee from an injury that went without proper treatment. Our feet, ankles and knees are particularly susceptible to damage as they carry the weight of the body and act as pivot points when we change direction or are undergoing strenuous activity. Sprains, stress fractures and torn or stretched ligaments or tendons are all common causes of pain later in life.

Sprain Pain

Often considered a common and collateral injury of even mild activity, sprained ankles usually don’t get the attention they should. The ankle is surprisingly vulnerable.  Few of us give much thought to stepping off a curb funny or experiencing pain when playing a sport like tennis. However, according to Dr. Hubbard-Turner of the University of North Carolina, student athletes with chronic ankle instability and sprains were significantly less mobile than their uninjured counterparts. What does this mean? We should get sprains checked out and treated appropriately as soon as possible to prevent an increase of immobility and painful arthritis as we age.

Stress Fracture Detractor

Stress fractures can range from a tiny crack in the bone to heavy bone bruising. Runners, tennis players and yes, even cyclists are prone to these fractures as our feet take a heavy beating during these activities. HealthPlus reports that almost 60% of athletes who have a stress fracture are likely to get another one later in life. Because fractures  are not a full break, it can be tempting to push through the pain. Do not do this, because the fracture can worsen or turn into a full break if put under enough stress for a long enough time. Without proper treatment, stress fractures lead to chronic discomfort, limited mobility and more fractures down the line.

Achilles Tendon

Your Achilles tendon is the band of tissue running from your heel up the back of your foot to your calf.  Sports with highly repetitive actions like basketball and high jump force this tendon to work harder than it is often used to which can lead to tendonitis or ruptures. You’ll know if you had Achilles tendonitis, because the pain radiates down your calf and often causes pain in your heel or on the bottom of your foot. If left unchecked or prevented from heeling properly, you’ll notice the tendon thickening and hardening which reduces mobility and makes walking very painful.

There are many ways new and old sports injuries can be managed and, in many cases, successfully healed. Seeing a medical professional should be your first step in assessing the severity of your injury and what options are available. In some cases, simply resting and icing can suffice but with older injuries it may take a more hands-on approach. Remember pain is not normal, if you’re suffering seek medical attention so you can get on the road to recovery!

Bunions – Identification & Diagnosis

Bunions are one of the more common foot ailments – more than 20% of 18 to 65-year-olds and more than 30% of seniors are affected. Research suggests individuals have a genetic predisposition for developing bunions, meaning you are more likely to develop them if your parents or grandparents had them.

Bunions are much more than just a bump; they are a serious and often painful deformity created by the big toe being bent towards the other toes instead of facing straight forward. Wearing tight shoes, injuries, and the above-mentioned genetic disposition are prime culprits. Other potential causes include:

  • Hypermobility and laxity within the foot
  • One leg being shorter than the other
  • Loose joints
  • Low arches
  • Arthritis
  • Flat feet

Identifying Bunions seems to be easy, but they can easily be confused with the following conditions:

  • Bursitis: painful and similar appearance; mostly temporary
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: painful and similar appearance; chronic
  • Gout: painful and similar appearance; temporary or chronic

Bunions develop slowly and become more difficult to treat over the years. Early detention might prevent surgery, so please don’t wait to contact your podiatrist if you identify a bunion-like swelling that won’t disappear.

Bunions

Bunions are a common foot problem that increasingly get worse over time. But what exactly are bunions and—more importantly—how can they be treated?

A bunion is a bump that forms at the base joint of the big toe. The big toe does a lot for helping us walk and stay balanced, and so developing a deformity around it is understandably uncomfortable. Bunions are produced when pressure pushes the big toe toward the smaller toe, sometimes settling under or over it. This alignment causes the base joint to slowly change shape, resulting in the infamous bony bump.

Bunions can result from many different factors, including genetics, injury, arthritis, and wearing tight shoes, so it pays to be aware of the symptoms of this disorder. Symptoms include:

  • A bump at the base of your big toe
  • Pain, swelling, or soreness
  • Numbness or restricted movement

Fortunately, there are a lot of things you can do once it’s been diagnosed you have a bunion. Getting periodic x-rays and evaluations of your toe joint is always helpful. Wearing comfortable shoes, padding your foot, icing your foot, and reducing activity that causes bunion pain are also recommended.

Easing bunion pain will not cure the deformity itself, however. Due to the disorder’s permanent and progressive nature, bunions will continually worsen with time. If bunion pain persists to the point where it’s affecting your daily routine it may be time to consider surgical treatment. A variety of surgical options are available for bunions, picking the right procedure just depends on the extent of the deformity and personal factors such as age and activity level.

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Tailor’s Bunion (Bunionette)

A bony prominence on the outside of the foot, behind the small toe, can be caused by a variety of conditions.  Shoes may be uncomfortable and walking can become difficult.  Often padding or shoe modifications can help to relieve these symptoms.  If pain persists, surgical treatment may be suggested.