Tag Archives: Early Detection

Flat Feet

If the entire sole of your foot touches the ground when you stand, then you probably have Flat Feet. Flat Feet are characterized by underdeveloped arches that prevent the typical gap between the sole and the ground from forming. This condition usually develops during childhood and throughout old age, but it can also be caused by accidents or diseases severally impacting bones or tendons forming the arch. Typical consequences include:

  • Foot, hip, knee, and back pain caused by an uneven distribution of body weight
  • Misalignment of your legs
  • Numb and/or stiff feet
  • Swollen ankles
  • Prematurely worn out shoes

Individuals experiencing Flat Feet might not experience any of these symptoms; however, if you are plagued by pain and/or restrictions in body movements on a regular basis it is advised to contact a professional. Potential treatments include:

  • Stretching exercises for your lower legs to prevent feet from rolling over
  • Orthotics to align your feet and to balance weight more evenly
  • Switching to different kind of shoes
  • Pain remediation

Surgery is an option in extreme cases like abnormal bone development in your feet and can usually be prevented. Read more about Flat Feet here and don’t hesitate to contact your podiatrist if you have any questions:

Common Winter Foot Problems

As we make our way through these winter months, here are some tips to keep in mind on some of the most common problems we see in our office during the winter months:

Dry Cracked Skin

Dry cracked skin results from a lack of moisture frequently caused by the use of harsh soaps, improper footwear, and conditions such as eczema and even diabetes. Having sweaty feet and wearing wet socks often affects children. Frequently soaking your feet in warm water for 20 minutes and moisturizing them afterwards often does the trick.

Fractures

Factures often occur through athletic activities, but a slip on the sidewalk can cause fractures as well. Reports even mention that standing on a hard surface for an extended period of time can result in tiny fractures. Watch out for bruising, pain, swelling, and/or a change of color and contact your podiatrist if symptoms don’t disappear within a reasonable period of time.

Frostbite

We all know frostbite warnings and typically think about the effects the cold has on our ears, nose, and hands; however, frostbite affects your feet in a similar way. Kids especially might not realize the dangers of playing in the snow for an extended period of time. Check your kids’ feet for red/purple toes and make sure their shoes are both warm and waterproof. Get immediate help if a toe has turned black! Another risk group is people with diabetes.

Bathe your feet in warm water (100 degrees) after a long day in the cold, but avoid using a hair dryer or any other source of aggressively dry heat. Needless to say, regular foot exams will make sure you haven’t overlooked any problems and they can also determine whether you are more prone to particular problems and conditions than others. Prevention is still the best medicine after all.

Find more information at

Smith - Picture (Blog. January 2017) - 11-1-17

Don’t put off foot problems. Early detection of issues is important.

Putting off problems that could potentially be harmful for us in the long-term is irresponsible. This especially applies to issues that become worse over time and can in many cases be prevented by early treatment.

Seeing your podiatrist on a regular basis to check on the status of your feet is recommended. Individuals with diabetes are especially advised to monitor their feet as glucose in your blood from diabetes can cause nerve damage and poor blood flow, which can lead to serious foot problems. Calluses, blisters, ingrown toenails, bunions, plantar warts, hammertoes, dry skin, and fungal infections might lead to severe infections and pain, thus impeding your ability to walk over time.

For more information please visit: http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/Diabetes/prevent-diabetes-problems/Pages/keep-feet-healthy.aspx

Smith - 10-15-15