Tag Archives: Orthotics

Orthotic Shoes to Beat the Summer Heat

Orthotics improve your well-being by relieving pain and correcting your gait, but finding shoes to accommodate your orthotic inserts remains a challenge. Common questions you need to ask yourself when buying new shoes include the following:

  • Is the footbed deep enough?
  • Is there extra space around the toes?
  • Is a larger size than you would usually need available?
  • Does the shoe allow you to easily adjust orthotics?

Finding fashionable yet durable summer footwear is even more of a challenge, which is why we would like to introduce a couple of models for those of you using orthotics.

Wolky Jewel Sandals

These lightweight sandals with wedge heel come in many different styles. Removable footbeds and upper straps allow for easily fitting orthotics.

Naot Paris

The stylish Naot Paris sandal offers a removable, anatomic cork & latex footbed which is wrapped in pampering suede and molds to the foot with wear.

Propet TravelActiv Mary Jane

Propet’s durable sandals with removable insoles for custom orthotics are ideal for taking a stroll with the family. Their loop closure at instep ensures a comfortable grip.

Our office team is more than happy to consult on summer orthotic footwear to meet your unique needs. We also carry a full line of prescription footwear, socks and other items used to care for your feet.

Foot and Leg Stretching Exercises

Remaining active during the COVID-19 lockdown is a challenge for most people. Some have spontaneously created a home workout routine or even attempted building their own workout equipment. In any case, stretching your feet and legs daily will provide relief against inactivity and warm you up for some home routines. Since many stretching exercises are fun and have health benefits for senior citizens as well, the entire family can participate in the following activities together.

Medical News Today offers detailed instructions for the following exercises promoting flexibility, mobility and strength. Their gifs and step by step instructions are especially well-suited for beginners.

  • Big toe stretches
  • Toe raise, point and curl
  • Toe splay
  • Toe curls
  • Marble pickup

Ready for the next level? Healthline offers similarly descriptive instructions on stretches, but focuses more on exercises you perform while standing. They suit most children and adults alike.

  • Ankle circles
  • Achilles stretch
  • Towel stretch
  • Band stretch
  • Standing calf stretch
  • Standing soleus stretch
  • Cross leg ankle stretch
  • Chair Pose

You can also check out Ardash Williams, a popular Yoga instructor. He created a YouTube video with tips on more advanced leg and feet stretches for healthy adults. These work best for individuals who have experience with professional workout equipment.

Some exercises are more adequate than others depending on your age and physical health. Please reach out to our office for more information on foot and leg exercises you can safely perform from home.

Shoe Inserts, Known as Orthotics, Have Come a Long Way

We have all had the experience of having a pebble in our shoe, and we know how much that tiny object can interfere with our ability to walk pain-free.  Switch from a pebble to a condition or injury that causes pain, and you can understand how for centuries, people have tried to figure out how to make walking more comfortable.  Today, orthotics is a professional clinical specialty, where each patient is treated for their specific condition, with a ton of proven science behind each diagnosis and treatment.  But there’s a long history leading up to this point.

In 1780, Swiss doctor Jean Andre Venel set up the world’s first orthopedic clinic to help children with skeletal deformations.  He pioneered the production of various orthotic devices.  The 19th century Welsh surgeon Hugh Owen Thomas developed the method of examination of deformation in a lying position, and is considered the father of orthopedics in the United Kingdom.  The first modern orthotics began to be developed in the early 20th century, assembled from metal components padded with felt, and covered in leather.  In 1906, Dr. William Scholl (yes, THAT Dr. Scholl) introduced a lighter, more flexible metal support called the Foot-Easer.

But this mode of design remained largely unchanged for decades.

Orthotics became more prevalent as a way to help injured veterans of two world wars, as well as polio victims of the 1940s and 1950s.  The demand for corrective shoes was so high that there were close to 1000 different brands.  The advertising campaigns were so outrageous that the Federal Trade Commission had to begin issuing cease and desist orders.  The corrective shoe industry began to fade away.

Then, in 1968, an article was published describing the use of polypropylene to fabricate lower-leg braces for children with spina bifida.  Parents began asking for “plastic braces,” and a revolution was born, not just in the design of orthotics, but in how they were prescribed.  Manuals and textbooks had tended to pigeonhole each patient into a set category.  For each category, there was a device, but the patient and the device were often not well matched.  With new and more specialized manufacturing options, diagnosis and treatment began to focus more on achieving an exact match between the patient’s needs and the device used.

By the late 1970s, jogging became much more popular, and foot orthotics developed even more rapidly, as athletes reported more foot and lower limb injuries.  In the 1980s and 1990s, athletic shoes were developed with features such as flared heels, contoured sole inserts, and underfoot cushioning.

Today, skin-friendly Velcro straps have replaced leather.  Dynamic ankle braces made of light carbon fiber have replaced orthopedic shoes.  Though there are devices available over-the-counter, anyone wanting a solution that will match their specific needs should get a specific diagnosis and proposed treatment.  Dr. Smith offers both ready-made and custom-made orthotics.  To ensure they are as effective as possible, he will prescribe and fit them to you based on your diagnosis, foot shape and other factors.  Remember, foot pain is NOT normal.  An appointment with Dr. Smith is the first step toward feeling better.

Sources:
https://www.thompsonhealthservices.ca/origins-of-orthotics/

https://www.academia.edu/39269847/A_Brief_History_of_Prosthetics_and_Orthotics_of_the_Lower_Body_and_Their_Types20190526_72374_ms8gro

What can orthotics do for me?

Foot orthotics are insoles for your feet that are typically associated with people who need arch assistance; yet there are many others who can benefit. The properties within orthotics, either over-the-counter or custom made, have the purpose of ensuring the bones in your feet and ankles are generally positioned correctly. Benefits differ among different people, because individual amounts of walking, pace and stamina are not identical.

People who suffer from foot, knee and back pain are encouraged to wear orthotics regardless of your degree of pain, because it can relieve your suffering. They can also lower muscular fatigue and promote more efficient muscle performance.

Athletes may seek orthotics, because it can help increase endurance, strength and your performance. Overweight individuals can relieve the stress weight puts on the ligaments in their feet. Individuals who have diabetes or arthritis can enhance their mobility and reduce strain on parts of their body.

Ask your podiatrist whether orthotics can make you feel more comfortable, at ease and balanced one step at a time.

Find out more at http://www.bpm.ca.gov/forms_pubs/orthotics_brochure.shtml

Smith - 12-15-15

Orthotics: What are they and do I need them?

Are you uncomfortable in your own shoes due to flat feet, heel pain or toe issues?  Orthotics can help address these issues and other foot conditions you may have.

Orthotics are shoe inserts to help control the position and movement of the feet.  They also absorb shock by adding extra cushion for your feet. Orthotics can correct an irregular gait and relieve pain in your feet, even your back and other joints. Orthotics come in the form of shoes, splints and shoe inserts.

As summer approaches, you are more likely to be doing activities requiring you to be on your feet.  So, give yourself some relief and get comfortable in your own shoes with the proper Orthotics to meet your needs.