Tag Archives: Tips

How to Avoid Winter Foot Conditions

Even though the holidays are officially over and temperatures have been normalizing a bit, be mindful that sudden temperature drops may happen anytime and cause uncomfortable foot conditions. This is even more relevant for those who participate in winter sports.  So, here are the top five winter foot conditions:

1. Chilblains

Chilblains occur when the blood vessels in your skin do not respond in time to sudden temperature changes. Symptoms may include small, itchy red spots, blistering or skin ulcers, and swollen burning skin. In order to avoid chilblains, limit your exposure to cold, cover all exposed skin as much as possible, bundle up to keep your body warm and do not smoke.

2. Raynaud’s Phenomenon

Raynaud’s Phenomenon occurs when your blood circulation is limited in certain areas of your body, especially your fingers and toes.  This low blood circulation causes these areas of your body to feel numb and cold. This often happens due to cold temperatures or stress. Prevent Raynaud’s Phenomenon by keeping your house and office warm and by being cautious when you are outdoors.

3. Skier’s Toe

Are you a fan of skiing? While it is certainly fun, please keep in mind your toes. If you notice your toenail has become black, it is likely you have bleeding under your nail, or “subungual hematoma”. This condition can be caused by trauma or continuous use of tight shoes. Make sure your socks fit and your boots have enough room for your toes to avoid this condition.

4. Morton’s Neuroma

Did you know winter boots may cause Morton’s Neuroma if they don’t fit properly?  With this condition, you can feel as if you are standing on a pebble in your shoes, experience a burning pain in the ball of your foot, as well as tingling or general numbness. Morton’s Neuroma may lead to foot deformities, so get fitting shoes and ask your podiatrist for treatment options.

5. Blisters

Similar to Morton’s Neuroma and Skier’s toe, foot blisters are caused by unfit shoes. To best prevent the condition, wear well-fitting socks and shoes. Do not attempt to wear those non-returnable unfit pairs of boots you got for Christmas. If you do get a blister, avoid popping it yourself. Instead, clean it with disinfectant and cover it with a bandage for protection. If it opens, make sure you pay a visit to your trusted podiatrist as soon as possible.

 

Everyday tips to take care of your feet

Our feet take us everywhere we need to go and as such, we should take care of them.  It isn’t difficult to set up a good foot care routine.  Following the items below will help prevent some of our most common foot problems.

  • Wash your feet with soap and water to make sure you get in and between toes. For extra pampering, soak your feet once a week in warm water with a few drops of peppermint or tea tree oil.  Use a pumice stone to gently exfoliate dead skin cells.
  • After washing, towel-dry your feet thoroughly. (Moisture between toes is a major cause of athletes’ foot).
  • Moisturize feet with a natural moisturizer.  Some brands are scented with mint or peppermint oil and others come in a rub-on stick, so they moisturize without making feet slippery.
  • Wear comfortable shoes and consider alternating pairs.  Don’t try to squeeze into a shoe that’s a half size too small, just because they’re just the style you like and on sale!  Also, having a spare pair to allow you’re the perspiration in your shoes to completely dry out for a day or so.

Foot resolutions

Tis the season for resolutions and our office would like you to remember your feet this season. We have ten tips to help keep your feet happy and healthy throughout 2014.

Keep your feet clean and dry. Any excess moisture between the toes can create a great environment for a fungal infection to begin.

Examine your feet for problems.

Cut toenails properly. Cut nails straight across and avoid trimming too close to the skin or drastically rounding the corners of the nails, which can cause painful, ingrown toenails.

Don’t hide “ugly” toenails with polish. Applying nail polish to an infected nail could make the problem worse.

Protect your feet in public areas. Be sure to wear shower shoes at the gym, in locker rooms, and at public pools.

Avoid sharing footgear.

Head off sweaty feet. Your feet have sweat glands galore — 250,000 in each foot! Perspiration creates the perfect environment for bacteria to set up shop.

Choose breathable footwear. To help keep your feet dry and healthy, wear shoes made of leather to allow air to circulate.

Wear shoes that fit properly. Shop for shoes at the end of the day to compensate for foot swelling that occurs later in the day, and wear the same type of socks or hosiery you’ll be wearing with the shoes.

Know when to see a doctor. Allowing a doctor to take a look will help prevent minor problems from becoming major ones

Most people think of tendonitis affecting the shoulders; did you know it can also affect your feet?

Do you feel pain in your feet or around your ankle after exercising? Running, walking, swimming and other activities can cause excessive strain on the tendons in your feet. Tendonitis can cause pain and, occasionally, swelling.

The most common cause of tendonitis in the feet is overuse. An increase in your exercise regimen can cause more strain on the tendons.

Before starting any physical activity, remember to stretch. Stretching your feet and ankles can help prevent tendonitis from developing. Also, be sure to wear properly fitting shoes. If you sense tendonitis symptoms, decrease your activity and apply cold compresses.

Recurring or severe pain may mean a rupture or tear in the tendon. Get your foot checked out if that happens.

Take it easy on your feet, and remember to stretch.