Tag Archives: Warts

4 Common Children’s Foot Health Problems

We regularly blog about podiatric issues in adults, but it is crucial to keep an eye on our children’s foot health too. Many foot issues affecting adults, also happen in children. Some of them occur more frequently, because their bodies are constantly growing. Some of the more common foot issues include; ingrown toenails, plantar warts, flat feet and heel pain.

Ingrown toenails are when the toenail grows into the skin of the foot causing pain and sometimes even an infection. Children may experience this more often, because they tend to wear tight fitting shoes as their feet grow out of their shoes.

A plantar wart is more specifically known as a skin lesion on your foot, which is caused by a virus. It is often mistaken for a callous, because of its similar appearance.  However, the subtle difference is identifiable by the black dots seen in the infected area. The most common spot for this infection is on the sole of your foot, because it is the most prone to micro-trauma throughout the day. Because this virus thrives in warm wet environments, one of the most common methods of picking it up is after walking barefoot at a pool.

Flat feet are also referred to as “Pes planus” and they are defined as feet with little to no arches. Most children experience flat feet due to developmental changes which are likely to be outgrown.  However, you child should be treated by a professional if he or she experiences foot or leg pain, difficulty walking or if one foot is flatter than the other. Many people with this condition experience no negative symptoms, though the condition should be monitored for changes.

Another common issue to look out for is plantar fasciitis. This creates pain on the bottom of the heel after activity or rest. It is even more common among children with Sever’s disease, which occurs in active children age 8-14. Another cause for heel pain is when the calf muscles and Achilles tendon tighten during growth spurts.

It is important to make sure you and your children get these foot problems treated right away if you feel like you may be experiencing any of these conditions. After all they’re using those feet continuously and more use does make problems worse. For more information, click here and even here.

How Sports Injuries Can Affect You Later in Life

For many of us, one of life’s great joys was playing sports in our youth. A lot of you know I’m an avid cyclist and have been for some time now, but there is always the daunting possibility of an injury that can have ramifications decades later. You probably even know someone who played softball or football in high school or college who still has a bad back or knee from an injury that went without proper treatment. Our feet, ankles and knees are particularly susceptible to damage as they carry the weight of the body and act as pivot points when we change direction or are undergoing strenuous activity. Sprains, stress fractures and torn or stretched ligaments or tendons are all common causes of pain later in life.

Sprain Pain

Often considered a common and collateral injury of even mild activity, sprained ankles usually don’t get the attention they should. The ankle is surprisingly vulnerable.  Few of us give much thought to stepping off a curb funny or experiencing pain when playing a sport like tennis. However, according to Dr. Hubbard-Turner of the University of North Carolina, student athletes with chronic ankle instability and sprains were significantly less mobile than their uninjured counterparts. What does this mean? We should get sprains checked out and treated appropriately as soon as possible to prevent an increase of immobility and painful arthritis as we age.

Stress Fracture Detractor

Stress fractures can range from a tiny crack in the bone to heavy bone bruising. Runners, tennis players and yes, even cyclists are prone to these fractures as our feet take a heavy beating during these activities. HealthPlus reports that almost 60% of athletes who have a stress fracture are likely to get another one later in life. Because fractures  are not a full break, it can be tempting to push through the pain. Do not do this, because the fracture can worsen or turn into a full break if put under enough stress for a long enough time. Without proper treatment, stress fractures lead to chronic discomfort, limited mobility and more fractures down the line.

Achilles Tendon

Your Achilles tendon is the band of tissue running from your heel up the back of your foot to your calf.  Sports with highly repetitive actions like basketball and high jump force this tendon to work harder than it is often used to which can lead to tendonitis or ruptures. You’ll know if you had Achilles tendonitis, because the pain radiates down your calf and often causes pain in your heel or on the bottom of your foot. If left unchecked or prevented from heeling properly, you’ll notice the tendon thickening and hardening which reduces mobility and makes walking very painful.

There are many ways new and old sports injuries can be managed and, in many cases, successfully healed. Seeing a medical professional should be your first step in assessing the severity of your injury and what options are available. In some cases, simply resting and icing can suffice but with older injuries it may take a more hands-on approach. Remember pain is not normal, if you’re suffering seek medical attention so you can get on the road to recovery!

Plantar Warts – Identification & Prevention

What are Plantar Warts?

Similar to other warts, plantar warts are caused by an infection of the skin caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV).  Plantar warts usually appear on the heel or ball of your foot, anywhere where large amounts of friction and pressure are applied.  This virus enters your body through tiny cuts, lesions or breaks in the bottom of your feet. Although Plantar Warts can affect anyone, they are more common among children, teenagers and people with weakened immune systems. Plantar warts are not a serious health concern and go away untreated or with home remedy treatments. But, if they become painful, start bleeding, reoccur or multiply please see your Podiatrist.

How to Identify Plantar Warts?

Plantar Warts are small, rough and appear on the soles or heels of the feet. Plantar warts can be flat and commonly grow inward under a hard, thick layer of skin such as the calluses on your feet. They can be a single wart or grow in a cluster also known as mosaic warts. Additionally, plantar warts may appear to have tiny black pinpoints inside the wart, also known as wart seeds. Don’t worry, these are just clotted blood vessels. Plantar warts usually grow slowly, but are easily identifiable because they often cause pain or tenderness in the area of the foot affected when walking or standing.

How to Prevent Plantar Warts?

It is hard to say how each person’s immune system will react to encountering HPV, but the spread of plantar warts is usually caused by coming in contact with an infected surface. Since it thrives in warm, moist environments, avoid walking barefoot in locker rooms, swimming pools and public shower rooms. Use shower sandals, keep your feet dry, always wear clean shoes and socks and avoid sharing socks with other people. To avoid spreading plantar warts, avoid direct contact with people who have them.  If you have a wart, do not scratch them.  Scratching can help plantar warts spread quickly to other smaller cuts and lesions.  Last, always cover your warts in warm environments to avoid getting more and spreading to others.

Learn more about Plantar Warts here:

Warts

Warts are persistent and—worst of all—contagious. These small growths can form on the bottom or top of the foot and develop when the skin becomes infected with a virus.

Plantar warts are flat and usually have a hard surface, and most commonly occur in children, teens, the elderly, and people with certain conditions (allergies, immune system deficiencies, etc.). While not life-threatening, if left untreated plantar warts can swell in size and cause additional pain and bleeding. Warts do go away on their own, but this process can take months or even years—allowing the virus that causes warts to spread to others in the meantime.

Plantar wart symptoms include:

  • A small rough growth located at the bottom or top of the foot.
  • Tiny black or red dots. These are actually small, dried blood vessels inside the wart.
  • Pain while walking or standing.

Prevention

The virus that causes warts enters any cuts or weak points on the foot, and thrives in warm, moist environments—such as gyms, locker rooms, and pools. Because of this, the best way to prevent plantar warts is to always wear shoes or sandals. Socks and shoes should be kept clean and dry, while feet should always be checked periodically.

Treatment

If you notice you have a wart, try not to touch or irritate it. Consult a doctor for immediate relief or removal. Medical techniques include various treatments, cryotherapy, or surgery. Home treatments of warts are always tempting and convenient, but in some cases can make things worse.

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What is a wart? How did I get one? Will it go away on its own?

A wart is a small, hard, benign growth on the skin, caused by a virus.  Warts are ugly, persistent and contagious.  They can occur on both the top and bottom of the foot. Plantar warts are usually flat and wide with a rough surface raised above the skin’s surface.

Warts are caused by a virus that invades the skin and can be avoided by wearing shoes at all times.  This virus thrives in warm, moist environments such as gyms, locker rooms and showers.  Warts can more easily affect children, teens, and people with conditions like allergies or immune system deficiencies. 

Warts can go away on their own, but it may take months or even years. If you have a wart on your foot, do not touch or scratch the wart. We will be able to tell if we need to medicate the wart to remove it or remove it physically with a special instrument